Highlights from Unpulgging

If you didn’t know, I’m a fan of the blog A Practical Wedding. It’s a refreshing voice in the sea of wedding blogs focused purely on aesthetics, taking time to tackle some of the big issues of wedding planning (like all of those raging emotions!). Today there was a post on revelations while being Unplugged and I wanted to take the time to share some great quotes, so here they are:

  • “So we were lying together in the hammock, holding hands, watching the sun turn the tops of the trees pink, and listening to the birds sing their farewell song. I realized the moment reminded me of the best parts of my childhood, and that I hadn’t been able to just sit and enjoy my surroundings like this for ages. The hard work of unplugging was finally paying off, and for the first time in a long time I felt like my work was serving my life, instead of my life serving my work.”
  • “We’re the land of huge houses, huge cars, huge credit card debts, and hugely long working days, so we were never going to be worried about having just enough. Nope. We want it all. And we’re juggling and hustling and stressing and guilting ourselves as we strive for a goal that we are convinced isn’t impossible…”
  • “If you add that up and assume 8 hours of sleep a night, that gives the average American a grand total 13 free hours a week, give or take. And by ‘free time’ I mean time they need to spend eating and dressing themselves.”
  • “‘My problem wasn’t so much working in front of computers all day. My problem was the way my brain was reacting off of computers. My old, less jumpy brain was what I was missing. I missed that unspooling reel of thought. I missed writing longhand and not wondering if an email had come in while I was doing it. I missed staring up at the leaves on a tree and thinking about nothing in particular.'”
  • “’Even as I watch myself, and those around me, cramming our days with messages to check, alerts to read, and Pinterest boards to fill, I know those actions are not really our goal. We’re reading blogs because we crave smart conversation and connection. We’re pinning things to remind us of what our lives could be. We’re finding places online that we fit, to remind us of who we are. But at some point you have to stop pinning, and start doing. Sure, those pinboards of party ideas are great, but what’s really excellent is lying around the deck with your friends eating cake, not thinking about doing it.’”
  • “Unplugging allowed me to step back and get some perspective on what matters in the flesh and blood world. And it’s my kid, my husband, my friends, and doing work I love.”

Now I love the internet, but sometimes we need to step away for a while so it doesn’t take over. The internet can be an awesome way to connect with people and a great learning tool, but when we allow it to overstep its bounds it detracts from meaningful moments in our lives.

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